Maybe you can help me with a dilemma?

For the past 13 years, I’ve been making a precarious living as a writer. As I’m also a carer, I can’t get a full-time job, so I’m reliant on freelance gigs and book contracts to keep me afloat.

Ko-fi also helps. It’s a site where fans can support their favourite creators through small one-off or monthly payments in return for behind-the-scenes stories and posts.

It’s been a lifesaver at times.

But here’s my quandary. I appreciate the awesome community I’m building on Ko-fi, but I don’t know what to offer them in return. As a time-strapped writer, there’s only so much content I can produce.

So, what can I offer? What would you like to see, and what would make you sign-up?

Take a look at my Ko-fi page and let me know what you think.

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Author: Gareth L Powell

Writer

7 thoughts on “Maybe you can help me with a dilemma?”

  1. What about a short (250-750) piece of flash fiction? Easy to dash off, and sometimes can inspire for something larger, plus good honing practice while also giving you a breather for a writing project. Once a week. Maybe write a list of themes or word prompts.

    It’s why I haven’t yet tried Ko-fi or Patroen, because of the commitment to producing something to give back every time. It’s hard. But I’m also lucky I am financially supported by my husband at the moment.

  2. Hi Gareth:
    Good to hear that the Ko-fi helps!

    I donate because I hope it will improve your quality of life and increase your productivity as a writer. So I wouldn’t be in favor of any sort of “reward for subscribing” that negatively impacted either of those.

    I think that means it should be something you’d like to do or would like to have an excuse to do. I saw a suggestion of doing a “five minute short story”. Or maybe more artwork?

    Anyway, hope things continue to improve!
    Best wishes,
    Will

  3. Assuming most of your subscribers are writers themselves, maybe offer instructive or “how to” posts. For instance, Stars and Bones is being hailed as dropping the reader “into the action from the first page…” So why not show subscribers how to write a noteworthy first page. Either show us your thinking behind the first page of this book (and others), or offer to edit a first page for a subscriber and post your revision and notes (with their permission). This idea can extend to other facets of writing; how to describe a character, how much description is too much, how to write dialogue, etc.

  4. I should have cited the quotation I used in my comment! It’s credited to John Scalzi on the book cover of Stars and Bones.

  5. Speaking for myself, I’d be happy with outtakes— deleted scenes or background material from published work. In other words, stuff you’d already written so that you wouldn’t have to spend a lot of time doing new content, so you could leverage off what might already be sitting on your hard drive. Hope this helps!

  6. You could g0 Scalziesque and post a lot of pet pictures. Couldn’t hurt.

    When I ‘oogled the title of your book the search brought up a fantasy novel with a similar name. Do authors check for such similarities before committing to a book name?

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